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How To Plant A Potted Garden Rose

Read on for my how-to guide for planting a five gallon potted garden rose.


WHAT TOOLS AND SUPPLIES DO I NEED TO PLANT A POTTED ROSE?

You don’t need a lot of tools to get your rose in the ground. Here are my must-haves to make planting easy:

·  Rose Gauntlet Garden Gloves

·  Spade

·  Mycorrhizae

·  Rake (optional)

·  Aged Compost

 

 

HOW DO I PREPARE TO PLANT MY POTTED ROSE?

Before you remove the rose from its nursery pot, water it well 24 hours prior to planting. This will help rehydrate the roots, and keep the root structure intact when removed from the pot. If you water immediately before planting, the soil can become too moist and the established root structure can break apart.

Choose a planting site that receives a minimum of six hours of direct sunlight every day and ideally has rich, well-drained soil conditions. For good measure you can get a soil test too before planting.

Dig a hole about three- to four-inches deeper than the pot, and six- to eight inches wider (roughly three inches on each side). I don’t recommend placing any synthetic fertilizer or other soil amendments, like bone or blood meal, in the planting hole.

Sprinkle mycorrhizae fungi in the planting holeto stimulate root growth at planting. Follow package directions on the mycorrhizae for exact application rate. If you’re short on time this is not necessary step, but I’ve found it useful in giving the rose a little jumpstart to healthy growth and establish roots

 

 

HOW DO I PLANT MY POTTED ROSE?

Remove the rose from the pot and position it in the center of the planting hole. If you have a grafted rose, in cold weather regions plant the bud union two- to three-inches below the ground. In warmer weather regions, I recommend you plant the bud union one- to two-inches above the ground. For own root roses, plant to the base of the canes. If you are not sure if your potted rose is own root or grafted, position it so the soil is just at the base of the canes.

Backfill in the hole and cover the roots with soil, pressing firmly to remove air pockets (take care to not break roots). Cover the base of canes with compost or compost plus mulch. Keep the feeder roots cool and moist in the warm summer weather, stabilize the plant in the event of wind, and help keep the weeds controlled.

 

 

HOW SHOULD I CARE FOR MY POTTED ROSE AFTER PLANTING?

Hand-water the rose at the base of the plant daily for one to two weeks to keep the roots well hydrated as the rose gets established in its new location. Newly planted roses need more water than established plants. After one to two weeks, place the plants on a drip-irrigation system, or hand-water at the base of the rose as needed depending on the weather.

No need to fertilize at planting as most potted roses you purchase from a reputable nursery will have already added a slow-release fertilizer to feed the plant for a few weeks after planting. You can begin a fertilizer regimen three to four weeks after planting when the rose has acclimated to its new location.

 

 

For more information on caring for your potted rose, I recommend contacting your local Rose Society or Master Gardeners for additional assistance and recommendations specific to growing roses in your climate zone or becoming a member of the Menagerie Academy, my online learning community filled with resources for growing great roses. 

 

Photos by: Jill Carmel Photography

This post may contain affiliate links. I make a small commission if you purchase a product from the link. I only recommend products I love and use in hopes they will help you too!

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